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ICYMI: Here’s Some New Articles and Interviews!

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10 Years a Nomad by Matt Kepnes
Posted: 8/12/2019 | August 12th, 2019

As you know, after eighteen months of writing and editing, my new book, Ten Years a Nomad: A Traveler’s Journey Home, came out last month.

Unlike my previous books, this is not a “how to guide” but a collection of tips, advice, and stories from the road. It a memoir of my ten years backpacking the world and the lessons I learned along the way.

This book gets to the heart of wanderlust and what extended travel around the world can teach us about life, ourselves, and our place in the world. (Or at least tries to.)

It’s meant to show people that if I, a sheltered nerdy kid from a small town, could muster the courage to do this and survive, you can too!

Cheryl Strayed called it inspiring. The Los Angeles Times said, “This book isn’t just for travelers; it’s for anyone who has wanted more and has taken off to find it.” Tony Wheeler, the founder of Lonely Planet, loved it. So did Rolf Potts.

And, more importantly, thousands of readers who keep sending me messages that they couldn’t put it down and it renewed their wanderlust. (For a writer, that’s the best thing we can hear.)

Over the last month, I’ve done a lot of interviews, videos, podcasts, and guest posts talking not only about my book but how you can travel more often – and be a better traveler when you do.

So I wanted to share some of what I’ve been up to so you can learn more about the book and get some travel tips at the same time:
 

Recent Interviews

Here are some interviews that I’ve done on the book, my travels, and my thoughts on being a better traveler:

Go BackpackingTravel Q&A with Matthew Kepnes, Author of Ten Years a Nomad

Expert Vagabond10 Years A Nomad: An Interview With Nomadic Matt

The Broke BackpackerAn Interview With Nomadic Matt

The Daily StoicTen Years A Nomad: An Interview With Matt Kepnes on travel and philosophy

Indie Traveller10 Years A Nomad: A Q&A With Nomadic Matt

NBC NewsHow “Deep Travel” Can Help You Get More Out of Your Next Trip

 

Podcasts

Love podcasts? I did a lot! Here are some you can download and enjoy on your next plane, commute, or walk:

LandlopersETW #24 Interview with Legendary Traveler Nomadic Matt

The Offbeat LifeHow to travel smarter and create a blogging empire with Matthew Kepnes

Afford AnythingSlow Travel is Cheap Travel With Nomadic Matt

Not a Ballerina Ten Years a Nomad with Nomadic Matt Kepnes – Episode 147 of The Thoughtful Travel Podcast

Zero to TravelTen Years A Nomad With “Nomadic” Matt Kepnes

 

YouTube Videos

I did two videos with two of my favorite Youtubers:

Hey Nadine10 Lessons learned from 10 Years a Nomad

Kristen and SiyaLife Changing Travel Experiences ft. Nomadic Matt

 

Book Reviews

On the fence about if you should buy the book? Well, why? It’s great! I poured my heart into it. Come support me! But, more seriously, here’s a bunch of reviews on what people thought:

View from the WingOut Today: Nomadic Matt’s Ten Years on the Road

Women on the Road What Can I Learn From A Travel Blogger Young Enough To Be My Son?

Travel CodexBook Review: “Ten Years a Nomad” by Nomadic Matt

Travel Writers ExchangeBook Review: Ten Years a Nomad

Go Girl GuidesBook Review: 10 Years a Nomad by Matthew Kepnes

Travel LemmingWant a Long Term Relationship With Travel? Read This First

National Geographic12 Travel Books You Won’t Be Able to Put Down This Summer

BooktribOffice Worker Turned Travel Junkie in “Ten Years a Nomad”

Publishers WeeklyTen Years a Nomad: A Traveler’s Journey Home

 

New Guest Posts

And, finally, I wrote a bunch of articles about how to be a better traveler – and do it for less money! Check them out here:

One Mile at a Time5 Ways to Get the Most Out of a Destination

Free CandieYou can only “run away” for so long

Helen in Wonderlust12 Travel Tips from Ten Years of Traveling the World

Medium9 Reasons Why Travel Is the Quickest Way to Become a Better Person

Thought Catalog Why ‘Influencers’ Are Bullshit

Newsweek9 Life Lessons I Learned From Being a Nomad For Ten Years

Traveling CanucksMy 10 Favorite Countries from 10 Years as a Nomad

The Travel Women10 Honest Lessons from 10 Years of Solo Travel

TravelFreakWhat I Learned From 10 Years of Travel

Entrepreneur.comHow to Start (and Run) a 7-Figure Business While Traveling the World

The Daily BeastWhy Backpackers are Good at Saying Goodbye

Medium.comThe Challenges of Writing A Memoir

 

The “Ten Years a Nomad” Book Tour

I’m finishing up my book tour and there are still a few more destinations left. Come join me, talk travel, get a signed book, and hang out!

August 14 Portland, OR: Powell’s Books at Cedar Hills Crossing @ 7:00pm EVENT DETAILS
August 15 San Francisco, CA: Book Passage at Corte Madera @ 7pm EVENT DETAILS
August 16 Seattle, WA: Third Place Books @ 6pm EVENT DETAILS
August 19 Vancouver, BC: Indigo (Robson) @ 7:00pm EVENT DETAILS
August 26 Toronto, ON: Indigo (Bay-Bloor)@ 7:00pm EVENT DETAILS
August 31 Montreal, QC: Indigo (Place Montreal) @ 1:00pm EVENT DETAILS

****

Thank you so much for your support and love over the years. I really hope you love this book. I wanted to write something that would appeal to a wider range of readers. Please help spread the word, get a copy, and I hope to see you on the book tour.

– Nomadic Matt

Here are links to buy the new book:

An amazon blue purchase button A blue Barnes and Noble purchase button 

Book Your Trip: Logistical Tips and Tricks

Book Your Flight
Find a cheap flight by using Skyscanner or Momondo. They are my two favorite search engines because they search websites and airlines around the globe so you always know no stone is left unturned.

Book Your Accommodation
You can book your hostel with Hostelworld as they have the largest inventory. If you want to stay somewhere other than a hostel, use Booking.com as they consistently return the cheapest rates for guesthouses and cheap hotels. I use them all the time.

Don’t Forget Travel Insurance
Travel insurance will protect you against illness, injury, theft, and cancellations. It’s comprehensive protection in case anything goes wrong. I never go on a trip without it as I’ve had to use it many times in the past. I’ve been using World Nomads for ten years. My favorite companies that offer the best service and value are:

Looking for the best companies to save money with?
Check out my resource page for the best companies to use when you travel! I list all the ones I use to save money when I travel – and that will save you time and money too!

The post ICYMI: Here’s Some New Articles and Interviews! appeared first on Nomadic Matt's Travel Site.





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What Does Travel Mean to You?

Posted By : webmaster/ 8 0


A solo hiker in a yellow jacket sitting in the mountains looking at the scenery around him
Updated: 8/5/2019 | August 5th, 2019

A few years ago, I went around the world and asked people what travel meant to them. As I travel the country on my current book tour and hear everyone’s reasons for travel, I’m reminded of that experience.

Travel means something different to every single person in the world.

There are a million and one reasons to travel. Many people travel the world to get the bug out of their system, or to check things off a list to say they’ve been there and done that. Some run to escape their problems. Some people travel simply to get drunk around the world.

For me, travel means many things. Travel is freedom. It’s about being able to do what I want and fill my day with excitement. Travel was an escape. Travel was “elsewhere”. That place where exciting things and people resided. It was escaping the Matrix to learn about the world, why people do what they do, and how they act. It’s about pushing myself to the limit and getting more comfortable in my own skin.

But I wondered what motivates other people to do the same.

I have my theories of course.

But I wanted to hear it from people directly.

So, during an extended trip, I asked people I met on the road one question:

“What does travel mean to you?”

And here is what they said:

***

I loved hearing everyone’s answers because it so accurately describes all the various reasons that push us to travel the world, learn about the people in it, and ourselves.

Now, tell me in the comments below:

What does travel mean to you?

Share what drives you.

 
P.S. – I just released a new book! It’s called “Ten Years a Nomad” and it’s about my ten years backpacking the world and the lessons I learned from it. It features tons of stories I’ve never told on this blog and is a book that delves into the why of travel! Click here to learn more, grab your copy today, and meet me on my book tour! This week I’ll be in Austin, Houston, Denver, and San Diego

Book Your Trip: Logistical Tips and Tricks

Book Your Flight
Find a cheap flight by using Skyscanner or Momondo. They are my two favorite search engines because they search websites and airlines around the globe so you always know no stone is left unturned.

Book Your Accommodation
You can book your hostel with Hostelworld as they have the largest inventory. If you want to stay somewhere other than a hostel, use Booking.com as they consistently return the cheapest rates for guesthouses and cheap hotels. I use them all the time.

Don’t Forget Travel Insurance
Travel insurance will protect you against illness, injury, theft, and cancellations. It’s comprehensive protection in case anything goes wrong. I never go on a trip without it as I’ve had to use it many times in the past. I’ve been using World Nomads for ten years. My favorite companies that offer the best service and value are:

Looking for the best companies to save money with?
Check out my resource page for the best companies to use when you travel! I list all the ones I use to save money when I travel – and that will save you time and money too!

The post What Does Travel Mean to You? appeared first on Nomadic Matt's Travel Site.





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My 12 Favorite Cities in the World

Posted By : webmaster/ 13 0


A long-exposure shot of the hectic streets of Bangkok, Thailand at night
Updated: 8/4/2019 | August 4th, 2019 (Orignally posted in 2011)

When you travel for a living, you get asked a lot of questions as you bounce from one hostel to another. The top one: what’s your favorite country?

The second most asked question: what’s your favorite city?

I’ve spent a long time traveling the world and have been to hundreds upon hundreds of cities in the world. There are so many that I love for many different reasons – some for art, some for history, some for the food, most for the people.

But, to me, the ones that stand out the most are the ones where I feel most at home. They are places I visit and feel connected too. Their energy and my energy match. I move around them with ease, I feel at one with the culture, and tempo of the city.

I think to myself “Yeah, I could live here.” Not just visit but live.

And, when I think that, then I know I’ve found a special place.

So what are my favorite cities in the world? Where are the places I feel that way? They are here:

 

1. Amsterdam

The historic buildings of Amsterdam that line the narrow canal
I can’t say exactly how many times I’ve been to Amsterdam, but it’s in the double digits. And, for a brief time at the end of 2006, I lived there as a professional poker player (Seriously. It’s one of the more interesting random facts about me!).

The fast-paced life, friendly locals, easy access to the rest of Europe, picturesque canals, and great architecture keep me coming back. Plus, it being Amsterdam and all, there are tons of weird and quirky things to see and do there too!

In some ways, Amsterdam reminds me of my hometown of Boston, which might be why I love it so much. The brick buildings, fast-moving people, austere vibe. It feels like home.

Favorite activity: Boating through the canals with friends.

Visiting Amsterdam? Check out my complete budget travel guide to Amsterdam! It’s hundreds of pages long and will help you plan the best trip there!
 

2. Paris

A Eiffel Tower on a bright, sunny day in Paris, France
Ever since I stepped out on the Champs Elysées, I knew Paris was it. It was everything I dreamed it would be I was in love from the first moment. Sure, Paris is large and expensive and bursting with tourists. But what big city isn’t like that?

Paris is beautiful, vibrant, and filled with great food and history. Being here is like being in a real-life romantic comedy. I love the city so much I even moved there for a good chunk of 2019. It really does live up to all the hype, especially when you move away from the tourist areas and into the local places more.

Favorite activity: Picking up some good food at the market and having a picnic.

Get my complete budget travel guide to Paris and plan the perfect trip! It’s hundreds of pages long and will help you plan the best trip there!
 

3. Bangkok

An up-close shot of the tuk-tuks in Bangkok, surrounded by bright neon lights at night
I hated Bangkok the first few times I traveled there. It was simply a dirty, polluted city with no redeeming qualities. It wasn’t until I moved there that I fell in love with it.

Bangkok, it turns out, is an easy city to live in — there’s lots to do, plenty of events, great bars, wonderful food (nothing beats Thai street food), and even more wonderful people. It’s just a bad tourist city. There’s just not a lot to do there for a tourist. It’s a city you live in.

Living in Bangkok showed me that looks can be deceiving and that there is more to a city than what you see on the surface. You just need to be willing to look a little deeper.

And, when you do, you always find something special.

Favorite activity: Live music at Brick Bar or eating noodles at a street stall.

If you’re visiting Bangkok, check out my complete budget travel guide to Bangkok! It has everything I know about the city in one easy place.
 

4. Stockholm

A beautiful picture of the Stockholm skyline and waters at sunset in Sweden
I have a strong affinity for all things Scandinavian, and Stockholm is no exception. I’ve been there a handful of times over the years, and I even tried to move there years ago (it didn’t work out).

I think this city is one of the most beautiful I have ever seen. The reds and greens of the buildings have an Old World charm that rivals cities like Prague, and during the fall, the changing leaves only highlight that beauty.

Stockholm is also very historic, with a high quality of life, and the Swedes in the city are super friendly and welcoming. It’s not a cheap city to visit, but it’s worth every penny!

Favorite activity: Getting lost in the maze of historic streets in Gamla Stan.

Check out my budget travel guidebook to Stockholm and plan your trip today!
 

5. New York City

The busy skyline of New York City on a sunny summer day
New York City is a place where dreams are made into reality and there is always something to do, something to see, or a new place to eat. The city is so multicultural that when I feel like I need to travel but I can’t, there’s an ethnic area of the city that will give me my fix.

I love NYC. It is the heart of the world to me. It is a non-stop place where you come to make it in the world. You can always find something to do, world-class food, people from all walks of life, and just a hustler vibe.

I spent close to five years living there and visit at least once a month (when I can).

It is the city you see in the movies.

Favorite activity: Walking the High Line and cooling off with drinks at the Grey Mare. (Tell Marcos I say hi!)

Since I spent so much time there, I wrote a budget travel guidebook to New York City! Pick it up for all the insider info you need!
 

6. Chicago

Tourists and locals looking at the famous art and architecture of Chicago, USA
After NYC, Chicago is probably my favorite US city, especially in the summer time.

While the winter months here can be brutal, this lakeside city seems to come to life after it emerges from its long and cold winter. Along with its lively atmosphere, the food here is delicious and the architecture is second to none. There’s a vibrant energy during the summertime as everyone is out in the parks, cafes, rooftop bars, on the lake, and watching the Cubs.

Chicago is just awesome.

Favorite activity: Going to a Cubs game!

For more, read our destination guide to Chicago and start planning your trip today.
 

7. Vancouver

The stunning skyline of Vancouver, Canada and its reflection in the water
I think this must be one of the most livable cities in the world. I’d certainly live in it, which is my benchmark for whether or not I really like a place. In Vancouver, you can go from the city into the mountains in minutes. I think that is really the highlight of the city for me — the fact that I don’t have to go far to be with nature.

Not only is there incredible nature nearby but there’s a park so big in the middle of the city, I often feel like I am in the center of a forest. Add in a vibrant food and art scene, and Vancouver is definitely a world-class city. It’s not a cheap city to live in, but that’s the price for all the amazing things Vancouver has to offer!

Favorite activity: Hanging out on Granville Island or walking around Stanley Park.

Read our desintation guide to Vancouver and start planning your trip today.
 

8. Queenstown

The rolling and rugged mountains of Queenstown, New Zealand
Perched on a lake in the stunning South Island mountains of New Zealand, Queenstown is a high-energy resort town for adventurers. This isn’t your typical city, as travelers come here because they want to be outside. There’s bungy jumping, hiking, rafting, zip-lining, boating, and tons more. It’s a paradise for the outdoorsy type and the perfect city for people who don’t like big, crowded cities.

The city and surrounding area are postcard-perfect (much like the rest of the country! I would jump on a plane and head back there right now if I could.

Favorite activity: Hiking the surrounding mountains.

Read our guide to Queenstown to plan your next adventure there.
 

9. Perth

The skyline of Perth, Australia lit up at night
Perth, Australia, is more like a big town than a city — and I think that’s what I like about it. It’s big enough to have a lot to do but small enough to feel cozy. I love Perth because of that small-town, big-city feel and for the fact that it’s on the water and has a great nightlife.

Not only that, but Perth is a great jumping-off spot to see the western Australian parks and natural sites, and it’s also close to hip Freemantle, which is home to my favorite Australian brewery: Little Creatures. I find it much more personal than other towns in Australia.

Favorite activity: Relaxing at the beach

Read our budget travel guide to Perth for more information!
 

10. Hong Kong

The skyline of the busy and bustling city of Hong Kong
Hong Kong is one of the best cities in the world for foodies. I always stop in when I’m in Asia and stuff my face with some of the best dumplings in the world. The city is busy and dense (it’s one of the most densely populated places on the planet) but it has a fun nightlife and tons of activities to keep you entertained, from markets to temples to nearby hikes outside the city.

While the city offers an interesting mix between eastern and western cultures, what really sets Hong Kong apart from other massive, dense cities is just how clean and well-organized it is. Getting around is a breeze, making it an easy and fun place to explore for a few days — or more!

Favorite activity: Eating dumplings!

Get my comprhensive budget travel guide to Hong Kong and know all the best local spots to visit!
 

11. Reykjavik

A birds-eye view of the Icelandic capital of Reykjavik as seen from the city's large church
Iceland is one of the most expensive countries in the world. As a budget traveler, you’d think that would keep me away but let me tell you something: it’s absolutely worth the price.

Reykjavik has tons of cozy cafes, wild clubs, cute architecture, and friendly pubs. It’s tiny, yet you can easily spend a few days here and not get bored (especially if you’re a night owl. Icelanders love to party).

Fortunately, as the tourism industry grows, there are more and more free (or cheap) things to do in the city. And with Icelandair offering free stopovers on flights between North America and Europe, it’s never been easier to visit this charming Scandinavia capital.

Favorite activity: Cozying up in a cafe to read and people watch.

Get my comprehensive budget travel guide to Iceland here!
 

12. London

The view overlooking the city of London and the river, including many of its famous attractions
As a history nerd, I’ve always loved visiting London. Some of the best museums in the world are there — and they are all free (there are tons of other free things to see and do as well).

But it wasn’t until last year when I spent a month in the city that I really “got” it. I understood why people loved it. There was a charming sophistication to the place.

Strolling the streets of the city, enjoying the markets, taking in the history of the place, laying in the park, and having a pint outside a pub? Heaven.

Paris will always have my heart but London comes close.

Favorite activity: Visiting as many museums as I can and then drinking at a pub.

Check out our travel guide to London to plan your trip.

***

There are you have it! My favorite cities in the world. Leave a comment on this post and let me know what your favorites are – and why!

 
 
P.S. – I just released a new book! It’s called “Ten Years a Nomad” and it’s about my ten years backpacking the world and the lessons I learned from it. It features tons of stories I’ve never told on this blog and is a book that delves into the why of travel! Click here to learn more, grab your copy today, and meet me on my book tour!

Book Your Trip: Logistical Tips and Tricks

Book Your Flight
Find a cheap flight by using Skyscanner or Momondo. They are my two favorite search engines because they search websites and airlines around the globe so you always know no stone is left unturned.

Book Your Accommodation
You can book your hostel with Hostelworld as they have the largest inventory. If you want to stay somewhere other than a hostel, use Booking.com as they consistently return the cheapest rates for guesthouses and cheap hotels. I use them all the time.

Don’t Forget Travel Insurance
Travel insurance will protect you against illness, injury, theft, and cancellations. It’s comprehensive protection in case anything goes wrong. I never go on a trip without it as I’ve had to use it many times in the past. I’ve been using World Nomads for ten years. My favorite companies that offer the best service and value are:

Looking for the best companies to save money with?
Check out my resource page for the best companies to use when you travel! I list all the ones I use to save money when I travel – and that will save you time and money too!

The post My 12 Favorite Cities in the World appeared first on Nomadic Matt's Travel Site.





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How to Visit the Seychelles on a Budget

Posted By : webmaster/ 14 0


a tropical beach scene in the Seychelles
Posted: 8/1/2019 | August 1st, 2019

In this guest post, Ellie Hopgood from Endlessly Restless offers some handy tips on how you can visit the Seychelles on a budget! This is a destination I’ve always dreamed of visiting so I was excited to have her write some tips for the country! It’s always viewed as one of the most expensive in the world but, as this post shows, it’s possible to visit on a budget!

The Seychelles, an archipelago of 115 islands off the east coast of Africa, are known for being extremely beautiful — and extremely expensive. The pristine turquoise water and white-sand beaches come with a hefty price tag.

If you want to drop serious money on a holiday, the Seychelles definitely have plenty of places perfect for an eye-wateringly expensive trip, with high-end rooms at the Madame Zabre Spa Resort on Desroches Island going for almost $15,000 USD per night, as well as a plethora of rooms available in the $500-$1,000-per-night range. There are even whole islands commandeered by one resort, such as Cerf Island, which consists solely of the 24 villas that make up the aptly named Cerf Island Resort.

But even though fancy resorts like that were way out of my budget, I was determined to visit these islands — and do so frugally, with a backpacker’s budget in mind.

After spotting an obscenely cheap and convenient flight deal — and desperate to get out there and explore these beautiful islands — I booked round-trip flights from London without much research (though I don’t necessarily recommend this approach to travel planning).

I typically travel in Europe (often in Eastern Europe), so my idea of what constitutes a cheap trip might be distorted. Paying over $15 for my share of a night’s accommodation pains me. So my eyes widened when I saw the average cost in the Seychelles. But the flights were booked, so I had no choice but to figure out how to see the islands on a budget. I set to work, reading blogs and forums furiously, but there was very limited information available.

After securing some affordable accommodation, I braced myself for a painfully expensive trip — but in the end, to my surprise, it was so much easier to be budget-conscious than I imagined.

Were the Seychelles the cheapest destination? No.

But, I learned, they don’t have to be prohibitively expensive either.

So, how do you save money in the Seychelles?

Here’s how you can take an affordable trip to paradise:

1. Find cheap flights (they do exist!)

We found round-trip flights from London with British Airways for just over $600, a deal so good that it sparked the whole trip. I always use Skyscanner, as that’s where I reliably find the best flight deals. As always, you’ll typically find cheaper flights if you travel in shoulder season; are flexible with exact dates, times, and layovers; and avoid school vacation periods. Some tips on how to save on your flight:

  1. Look at deal websites – Deal websites like Holiday Pirates, Scott’s Cheap Flights, and The Flight Deal often have great last minute fares and package deals to the islands.
  2. Search the main cheap flight websitesSkyscanner and Momondo let you compare prices and see if there are any budget carriers flying the route.
  3. Be flexible with your dates – Airline ticket prices vary depending on the day of the week, time of year, and upcoming holidays. Moreover, it’s always cheaper to fly during the middle of the week than on a weekend, because most people travel on the weekends and airlines hike their prices then. If you zig when others zag, you are going to find better deals.
  4. Travel hack – This is the best way to get cheap flights..because it gives you free flights. Airline rewards programs are a great way to get free flights, free upgrades, and free companion tickets. Points = free flights. Through credit card sign up bonuses, everyday spending, contests, online promotions, bonus points, and so much more, you can easily gain hundreds of thousands of points per year without ever spending extra money! To learn how to do this, check out this post!

For more tips on how to find a cheap flight, check out this post!

2. Stick to cheap guesthouses (that serve breakfast)

people walking down the street in the Seychelles

The Seychelles don’t yet have a lot of budget accommodations, but I was able to find affordable rooms using Airbnb, though similar rooms are also available through Booking.com. There are also a number of small guesthouses and hotels that offer rooms for $60–100 USD per night. While some of these places have their own websites, like our La Digue guesthouse Liane de Mai, others can only be booked through platforms like Airbnb and Booking.com, like our self-catered accommodation on Mahé via CAMEC apartments.

The best thing to do is to go onto your favorite budget accommodation site and put in the island you plan to stay on. That should show you a selection of accommodations so you can choose something in your price range.

To keep costs even lower, try to stay somewhere that offers self-catering facilities or that serves breakfast. Self-catering allows you to save by preparing your own meals, while an included breakfast takes care of a third of your meals and lets you fill up on delicious fruit, toast, yogurt, and eggs that will keep you going for hours. You can also take a few snacks from breakfast, like rolls or bananas, for later in the day when you need a boost of energy. All the places we stayed made clear in their Airbnb profile whether a kitchen was available or if breakfast was included, though you could also email and ask.

There is also a small Couchsurfing community in the Seychelles, with most of the hosts based on Mahé. Nothing is cheaper than free — so if you are fond of couch surfing and happy to stay on the main island, this might be a good option.

Check out our comprehensive resource section for more tips on finding cheap accommodation!

3. Eat take-out

Eating out in restaurants in the Seychelles is painfully pricey for fairly average food. A simple bowl of tomato pasta can easily run you $20 USD, while a three-course meal with alcohol will set you back $70–80 USD per person.

However, the Seychelles is also full of places to get take-out, small establishments, and mobile food vans all over the islands, directly alongside main roads or signposted clearly, serving up local dishes for incredibly low prices. These are where many of the locals eat dinner, along with visitors who are looking for delicious and cheap eats.

For only $3–5 USD, you can buy two main courses with a generous serving of rice and salad. These meals tend to be fresh, Seychellois dishes that change every day, typically curries made with fish, chicken, beef, or vegetables, served with rice and salad. There are also often Chinese-takeout-type dishes like fried noodles and rice.

My favorite find was Mi Mum’s on La Digue, which served the most delicious chicken “zye zye” curry with rice and salad for the unbeatable price of $4 USD.

4. Take the bus

Seychelles scenery

Taxis are insanely expensive — think $20 USD for a trip of only a couple of kilometers — and are not a viable option for anyone trying to travel on a budget. You can rent a car for around $40 USD per day, which may be manageable if you are traveling in a group or splitting the cost with someone, but still expensive compared to the cheapest option: the bus. (As a bonus, the bus is as much an activity as it is a convenient transport option, as the bus bounces up and down hills on a road bordering the ocean!)

On both Praslin and Mahé, you buy a flat-rate ticket as you get on and travel as far as you need to, whether that is one stop or ten. On Praslin, a bus ticket costs 7 SCR (50 US cents) while tickets are 6 SCR (45 US cents) on Mahé. The buses come infrequently, so it is worth consulting the timetable. I was given a Praslin timetable at my accommodation (though you can also find it online), and you can download Mahé’s extensive schedule here.

La Digue has very few cars and no buses, so walking and biking are the best options, which is also true for all of the smaller islands.

5. Stick to beach-hopping

a small pristine beach in Seychelles

While a small minority of beaches are only accessible if you are a guest of a specific resort, for the most part, the most glorious part of visiting the Seychelles (going to the beach) is completely free.

You can enjoy the pristine white sand and blue water; watch the birds, bats, and tortoises move around the island; and explore the amazing undersea wildlife straight from the beach — and it won’t cost you a dime.

My favorite free beaches are Anse Coco on La Digue, Anse Lazio on Praslin, and Beau Vallon on Mahé.

One big exception to the free beaches rule is that Anse Source d’Argent on La Digue, which is one of the world’s most beautiful beaches, charges you for entry. The cost is 100 SCR ($7 USD) for a single entry, so go when you have time to spend the whole afternoon (or day!) enjoying the beach and its unusual rock formations. If you want to avoid the charge, then you can swim or walk through the ocean from just outside the entrance to the park and enter the beach that way. However, you’ll have to swim back out, as park rangers often check your ticket as you leave!

6. Bring enough sunscreen!

An easy way to save a few bucks is to bring more sunscreen than you think you’ll need. Sunscreen is very expensive ($15 USD for a small bottle) but also very necessary, given the blazing equatorial sun that can burn skin in minutes. I was woefully underprepared for the amount of sunscreen I would need, so much so that within two days I had to shell out a small fortune for a big enough bottle to get me through the rest of the trip. If you can avoid buying this necessary item on the islands, then do.

7. Move slowly

To get between the islands, you can fly or take a ferry. Neither way is particularly cheap. A return flight from Mahé to Praslin (which only takes about 15 minutes!) will likely cost $150–200 USD. Ferries are marginally cheaper: about $60 USD each way between Mahé and Praslin and around $20 USD each way between Praslin and La Digue.

There is only one ferry provider serving each of the main routes between the three major islands, making you a captive audience for their high prices. So unless you’re Michael Phelps, you’re stuck paying whatever Cat Cocos (between Mahé and Praslin) and Cat Rose (between Praslin and La Digue) charge for the tickets. The less you travel between the islands, the cheaper your total transport bill will stay.

8. Minimize cash withdrawals (and use the right ATMs)

sunset in the Seychelles

As in many other places, there are heavy charges levied on withdrawals at cash machines, to the tune of 100 SCR ($7 USD) per withdrawal. These withdrawal fees are fixed by the ATM and are different than foreign exchange fees. Charles Schwab and Fidelity offer cards that refund these ATM fees, though Fidelity does charge a 1% foreign exchange fee.

However, a simpler solution than opening a new checking account is to be vigilant about which ATM you use. Barclays ATMs levy the withdrawal charge, while MCB ATMs tend to have no fee. A full list of MCB ATMs can be found by clicking here.

ATMs will only give you rupees, though most prices are quoted in euros. You can bring euros with you or change them at the airport and banks for no charge. The Seychelles are largely cash-only, so figuring out how to get cash without incurring charges is important.

For more tips on avoiding ATM fees, check out our comprehensive article on how to avoid fees when traveling!

9. Drink the tap water (or at least bring a bottle with a filter)

While most online information says that the water in the Seychelles is not safe to drink, I quickly started drinking the tap water and was completely fine. Given the extreme heat and humidity, you will need to drink a lot of water, which adds up fast if you have to keep buying plastic bottles (not to mention the environmental impact of that much disposable plastic).

If you don’t feel comfortable drinking the tap water, then I’d recommend bringing a bottle with a built-in filter or buying a SteriPEN or Lifestraw. Not constantly buying bottled water will help keep both your costs low and the environment clean.

10. Bring your own mask and snorkel

a beach in the Seychelles
Unlike many beach paradises, you don’t need to go out on a boat to get to prime snorkeling territory. You can swim straight off the beach onto a reef and see rays, sharks, eels, fish, and more. I swam out from Anse Source d’Argent and was greeted by a friendly ray who let me follow him for half an hour in perfect peace. It was magical. However, renting a snorkel and mask often can get expensive. Snorkel rentals go for $10 USD a day or more. Bring your own to save money!

***

By following the above advice, it should be possible to take a trip to the Seychelles that doesn’t cost an arm and a leg (maybe just a hand). If you stay in small guesthouses that serve breakfast, eat takeout for most of your meals, spend most of your time exploring the beaches, and hunt for a good flight deal, you’ll spend between $120–140 USD per day (less if you are traveling with someone and can split accommodation costs), though it’s also good to leave some wiggle room for putting money in the hands of any Seychellois guides or vendors who really make a difference to your trip.

If you are willing to shell out more, then the sky’s the limit, but if splurging, I would recommend a guided tour through the jungle (it’s typically not safe to venture out alone) or diving, as the Seychelles are home to some world-famous dive sites. A whole day’s guided hike, including lunch and entrance to world-famous beach Anse Source d’Argent, costs about $70 USD, and each dive with Octopus Dive Centre was around $60 USD (less if you have your own equipment). I did both of these activities and they were completely worth it.

I firmly believe that the Seychelles is one of the world’s most beautiful places and should be on the bucket list of any avid traveler. And, hopefully, these budget tips will allow you to visit the Seychelles without breaking the bank!

Ellie Hopgood is an investment writer in London, covering topics in economics, politics and global finance. She writes about travel, politics and photography on her blog Endlessly Restless. She spends a borderline unhealthy amount of time editing photos and checking the cost of flights to places she has no immediate intention to visit. You can find her on Twitter (@elliemhopgood).
 
 
P.S. – Did you know I wrote a new book? It’s called “Ten Years a Nomad” and it’s all about the lessons I’ve learned from a life of travel. It features tons of stories and misadventures I’ve never told on this blog as well! Click here to learn more and grab your copy today! (I’m doing a book tour too! I’ll be in Austin, Houston, Denver, and San Diego next week!)

Book Your Trip to the Seychelles: Logistical Tips and Tricks

Book Your Flight
Find a cheap flight by using Skyscanner or Momondo. They are my two favorite search engines because they search websites and airlines around the globe so you always know no stone is left unturned.

Book Your Accommodation
You can book your hostel with Hostelworld. If you want to stay somewhere other than a hostel, use Booking.com as they consistently return the cheapest rates for guesthouses and cheap hotels. I use them all the time.

Don’t Forget Travel Insurance
Travel insurance will protect you against illness, injury, theft, and cancellations. It’s comprehensive protection in case anything goes wrong. I never go on a trip without it as I’ve had to use it many times in the past. I’ve been using World Nomads for ten years. My favorite companies that offer the best service and value are:

Looking for the best companies to save money with?
Check out my resource page for the best companies to use when you travel! I list all the ones I use to save money when I travel – and I think will help you too!

Looking for more information on visiting the Seychelles?
Check out my in-depth destination guide to the Seychelles with more tips on what to see, do, costs, ways to save, and much, much more!

The post How to Visit the Seychelles on a Budget appeared first on Nomadic Matt's Travel Site.





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Are You Happy With Your Life?

Posted By : webmaster/ 19 0


black and white photo of a busy crosswalk with blurred people
Posted: 7/29/2019 | July 29th, 2019

I was recently gifted the sci-fi thriller Dark Matter. Without giving too much away, the book revolves around the idea of a multiverse, where every possible outcome of a decision plays out — and each decision thereafter creates another split and so forth and so forth. It’s an infinite multiverse of all the possible outcomes of every decision you could ever make.

But, to me, it’s really a book about regret.

It’s about wondering what would have happened if you had followed the road not taken.

Where would you be if you had stayed with that girl, taken that job, or moved to that new city? Would you be happier as a result?

We map out how we hope our life will unfold.

First this, then that, then this, then that.

But life never unfolds the way we imagine it will. Life isn’t like writing a novel where you can plot out how things will end and ensure the characters behave as you want. Every decision you — and those around — make throughout the day shifts the direction of your life.

Life is what happens when you are busy making plans.

One day, we wake up and find we’re far off from the path we had hoped to traverse. We took a different job; broke up with that girl; suffered a health issue, family death, or financial disaster; moved somewhere new; decided to go back to school; or met someone who inspired us to travel the world.

A million and one things can pull us off the path we envisioned.

When you look back on the whole of your life, it’s easy to see where you deviated from the path you laid out for yourself. You can see the pivotal choices and moments that changed your life for good or ill.

What would have happened if my friend Scott had never convinced me to go to Thailand all those years ago?

Or if I had missed that bus in Chiang Mai where I met those backpackers who ended up inspiring my trip around the world?

What if I had never started this blog?

What would have happened if I had stayed in Taiwan with my girlfriend all those years ago?

Humans are really good at wondering about what might have been. We tend to look at our life in retrospect and judge our past actions by where we are now.

But when we’re in our life, you don’t see the grand vision. We’re just trying to get through the day as best we can. We’re thinking about the tasks at hand — the meeting in an hour, the laundry that needs to be picked up later, what we’re going to make for dinner — not the big picture.

Our brains aren’t hardwired for that kind of thinking.

For all our big talk about how humanity is different because we can think about the future, we’re often just like other animals: only seeing the moment right in front of us.

***

When I moved to Paris, I had big goals. I was going to meet people, attend influencer and tourism events, sightsee every day, and live that #bestlife.

Yet through long lunches and bottles of wine with friends and long days writing my new book, and by catching up on sleep and hosting a lot of friends, I strayed far from those original plans. Looking back, I did little of what I originally planned to do.

In a sense, I failed.

And I could easily look back with regret and wonder what would have happened if I had done what I had planned to do. What would I have learned about the city? Who would I have met?

But then I think back to Dark Matters and the question that sets the whole book in motion:

“Are you happy with your life?”

It’s such a simple but powerful question.

Beyond all the daily complaints and frustrations and minor annoyances, how often do we really ask such a deep and fundamental question?

“Are you happy with your life?”

Day to day, it’s easy to lose sight of the big picture. To never see the forest through the trees. To look back and think of the goals we made that we never reached.

But what we do every day is a reflection of our values and our goals.

If you’ve lived your values every day, haven’t you really reached those goals?

When you zoom out and ask yourself if you’re happy with your life, what do you say?

We get twenty-four hours to make the right choice.

And if we fail, we get to wake up and try again.

I wouldn’t trade those long meals and writing sessions or those quiet nights in for anything. They helped create a sense of balance in my life the first time in a long time.

When I look back at the what-ifs and see the choices I made, I can’t really regret them — because they brought me to where I am today.

And, when you’re happy with your life, how can you really regret the path that brought you there – even if it’s not the exact one you planned?

P.S. – I just released a new book! It’s called “Ten Years a Nomad” and it’s about my ten years backpacking the world and the lessons I learned from it. It features tons of stories I’ve never told on this blog and is a book that delves into the why of travel! Click here to learn more, grab your copy today, and meet me on my book tour!

Book Your Trip: Logistical Tips and Tricks

Book Your Flight
Find a cheap flight by using Skyscanner or Momondo. They are my two favorite search engines because they search websites and airlines around the globe so you always know no stone is left unturned.

Book Your Accommodation
You can book your hostel with Hostelworld. If you want to stay somewhere other than a hostel, use Booking.com as they consistently return the cheapest rates for guesthouses and cheap hotels. I use them all the time.

Don’t Forget Travel Insurance
Travel insurance will protect you against illness, injury, theft, and cancellations. It’s comprehensive protection in case anything goes wrong. I never go on a trip without it as I’ve had to use it many times in the past. I’ve been using World Nomads for ten years. My favorite companies that offer the best service and value are:

Looking for the best companies to save money with?
Check out my resource page for the best companies to use when you travel! I list all the ones I use to save money when I travel – and I think will help you too!

The post Are You Happy With Your Life? appeared first on Nomadic Matt's Travel Site.





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We Need to Stop Telling Women They’ll Get Assaulted If They Travel Solo

Posted By : webmaster/ 22 0


Kristin Addis walking across sand dunes in the desert
Posted: 7/25/2019 | July 25th, 2019

Kristin Addis from Be My Travel Muse writes our semi-regular column on solo female travel. In this column, she goes deep into the shaming culture surrounding solo female travel and how women are often told it’s not safe to travel (while men are told no such thing). It’s not an easy topic but one that’s very pertinent and needs to be discussed.

Many of us solo travelers receive pushback. Depending on what other people think we should be doing with our lives instead, the pressure can range from mild guilting to quite disturbing warnings.

“You’ll never get another job, never find a partner, never have children (or settle down in time to have them), and never have financial security,” they say.

“You’ll be an easier victim, get robbed, or be killed.”

But one thing sticks out when we consider solo female vs. solo male travelers:

Women are told much more often than men that they will “get raped” if they travel alone.

Based on my own research conducted by polling large, travel-focused Facebook groups, out of nearly 1,000 responses, 69% of female respondents reported being told they’d get raped if they traveled solo vs. 6.6% of men*.

Certainly, if we consider the data on sexual assault of women vs. men, many more women are victims than men worldwide. In the US, according to the National Sexual Violence Resource Center’s 2010 report, nearly 1 in 5 women in the US have been raped at some point in their lives. The stats are similar in Canada, where over 600,000 sexual assaults are reported by women per year, which is estimated to only be 5% of cases while the rest go unreported. A 2014 report by the European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights shows similar numbers.

Kristin Addis in a mountain landscape with glaciers

However, when we delve deeper into the numbers, we see that the overwhelming majority of this violence is inflicted by someone the victim knows. According to Statistics Canada, only 16% of violent assaults against women are carried out by a total stranger and in the US it’s estimated at around 22%.

What about when women travel abroad? I found that in countries with a lower socioeconomic status and even higher rates of sexual violence, the likelihood that the perpetrator was someone that the victim did not already know was also low, according to the World Health Organization’s global and regional estimates.

Further, the numbers show that getting sexually attacked abroad is rare. The number one crime is stolen passports. Unfortunately, the US does not report on sexual assault abroad, but the 2014 British Behaviour Abroad report does, and it shows that the government provided assistance to an average of 280 sexual assault victims abroad out of over 19,000 yearly consular assistance cases from 2009 to 2014.

Obviously, many sexual assaults go unreported abroad as well, and the world is generally not a safe place for women. Coercion still happens and the binge drinking culture in hostels doesn’t help keep women safe. However, based on all of the aforementioned research, it appears that most of the rapes that occur abroad take place between people who know each other and does not target tourists.

Kristin Addis posing in front of a bright blue lake in the mountains

This suggests that, by traveling, a woman is potentially putting herself in a less threatening sexual-violence situation than when she’s at home.

This led me to wonder: Why is it that the warning to women that they’ll “get assaulted” if they travel alone is so pervasive, even when the data does not support this? Is it because whenever tragedy does befall a solo female traveler, it’s front-page news that also often suggests that it’s her fault?

Contrast this to when a solo male meets tragedy and is referred to as an adventurer and “lover of life.” Why is the opposite so often true for a woman — who, as many in the comment sections of these articles can’t help but point out, shouldn’t have been traveling alone?

Why are men allowed to travel alone and women aren’t?

Is it simply too threatening, whether consciously — or more likely unconsciously — to see a woman going against the typical status quo and having more self-agency? Is it too abnormal to see a woman deciding that she does not need a partner or a friend or any kind of chaperone on a journey to another country (which, for those from the US, is likely to be statistically safer)?

When a woman goes against the status quo, it triggers people’s fear of change and their discomfort over a life not fully lived. This is why even women caution other women about the dangers of solo travel. The warning almost always comes from someone who has not actually tried to travel alone and does not have any firsthand experience.

Moreover, even though the world population has exploded, women are still guilted about turning away from the traditional gender role of getting married and having babies. But this has only been “tradition” for a few hundred years. Whole villages, including men, used to be involved in child-rearing, but modern motherhood is often a solitary job. That sure does make it easy to take a woman’s — and indeed any human being’s — greatest power, which is giving life, and make it a burden. It takes away autonomy and takes one out of the workforce. It keeps women dependent and out of positions of power.

The results speak for themselves. Women are paid less, on average, than men the world over. There are fewer female CEOs and fewer women in government (except for in Rwanda, which also has the cleanest capital in the world), even though people do better under female leadership.

Kristin Addis backpacking in the mountains

Thankfully, we’re seeing a worldwide shift and a discussion about the patriarchy coming to the forefront of mainstream media — something that’s been a long time coming, after centuries of female subjugation — but we have a long way to go.

Then there is the psychological effect of this pervasive warning given to solo female travelers to consider. Casting doubt on a woman’s sexual safety can powerfully affect her psyche, especially if she experienced sexual trauma at some point in her life already and has an altered emotional response to such threats.

That said, this warning about rape affects women whether they’ve experienced sexual trauma or not. A study conducted at a US university found that women who had not been victims of rape were still more likely to assume typical gender roles after being read a realistic description of a rape that had occurred on their own college campus, where the threat would feel more imminent to them.

Several similar studies referenced in the same book, Sex, Power, Conflict: Evolutionary and Feminist Perspectives, edited by David M. Buss and Neil M. Malamuth, found that just the threat of rape eroded trust of men by women and negatively affected women’s self-esteem and self-agency.

The threat of rape is a psychological weapon that is likely to discourage her not just from traveling but from trusting herself and her own abilities.

If a woman is mistrustful of men, and even worse, of her own self and abilities, then how in the world is she supposed to work up the courage to travel the world, especially solo? It’s much easier to keep a woman “in her place” if she doesn’t become independent, experience other cultures, and come to believe in herself and her abilities.

How, in light of this information, can we see telling a woman she’ll “get raped” as anything other than cruel and manipulative?

Kristin Addis standing in front of the Grand Canyon with some light snow

None of this is to lay blame on men, but rather lay out the facts: it’s false that a woman is more likely to get raped by traveling than she is by staying home.

We need to ask why female autonomy is such a scary concept in modern society. We need to recognize that by holding a woman back from her independence, even well-meaning friends and parents are killing her budding sense of self.

It’s up to all of us to support women who wish to grow and flourish in whatever ways they choose, including by traveling the world, especially solo. It’s the one thing in my life that built up more self-confidence and bravery than anything else I’ve done. I hope everyone gets to experience that at least once.

(Note: Unfortunately, there is a dearth of data on those who identify as nonbinary. Apart from the option I included in my own data collection — which still has too few responses to be statistically helpful — I didn’t see this group referenced in governmental research numbers. With that in mind, this post uses the data I do have access to, which focuses on those who identify as male or female.)

Conquering Mountains: The Guide to Solo Female Travel

conquering mountains: solo female travel by kristin addisFor a complete A-to-Z guide on solo female travel, check out Kristin’s new book, Conquering Mountains. Besides discussing many of the practical tips of preparing and planning your trip, the book addresses the fears, safety, and emotional concerns women have about traveling alone. It features over 20 interviews with other female travel writers and travelers. Click here to learn more about the book and start reading it today!

Kristin Addis is a solo female travel expert who inspires women to travel the world in an authentic and adventurous way. A former investment banker who sold all of her belongings and left California in 2012, Kristin has solo traveled the world for over four years, covering every continent (except for Antarctica, but it’s on her list). There’s almost nothing she won’t try and almost nowhere she won’t explore. You can find more of her musings at Be My Travel Muse or on Instagram and Facebook.

Book Your Trip: Logistical Tips and Tricks

Book Your Flight
Find a cheap flight by using Skyscanner or Momondo. They are my two favorite search engines because they search websites and airlines around the globe so you always know no stone is left unturned.

Book Your Accommodation
You can book your hostel with Hostelworld as they have the largest inventory. If you want to stay somewher eother than a hotel, use Booking.com as they consistently return the cheapest rates for guesthouses and cheap hotels. I use them all the time.

Don’t Forget Travel Insurance
Travel insurance will protect you against illness, injury, theft, and cancellations. It’s comprehensive protection in case anything goes wrong. I never go on a trip without it as I’ve had to use it many times in the past. I’ve been using World Nomads for ten years. My favorite companies that offer the best service and value are:

Looking for the best companies to save money with?
Check out my resource page for the best companies to use when you travel! I list all the ones I use to save money when I travel – and I think will help you too!

The post We Need to Stop Telling Women They’ll Get Assaulted If They Travel Solo appeared first on Nomadic Matt's Travel Site.





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What Does Travel Insurance ACTUALLY Cover?

Posted By : webmaster/ 18 0


A commercial jet flying high in the bright blue sky
Posted: 7/12/2019 | July 12th, 2019

Travel insurance is probably the most boring topic when it comes to planning a trip. Nobody wants to focus on the worst-case scenario before they even leave home.

Plus, researching insurance is just plain tedious. There is a lot of fine print to scour, requiring you to read over the minutiae of each insurance plan before you pick the one that’s best for you.

But it’s also the most important topic too. Should something terrible happen while you’re on the road, you want to have the confidence that your insurance plan will cover you.

While none of us want to imagine getting hurt or robbed or having to cancel our plans, the fact of the matter is that these things happen. It’s rare, but shit you don’t expect does happen when you travel.

I never expected to break my camera in Italy.

I never expected to rupture my eardrum scuba diving in Thailand.

I never expected to get stabbed in Colombia.

And while these unfortunate events are few and far between, it’s always better to be safe than sorry (trust me!). Medical bills aren’t cheap. Emergency evacuations cost tens of thousands of dollars. Unless you have a stockpile of disposable income, chances are you’ll want to buy travel insurance for your next trip.

There are a lot of misconceptions about travel insurance, so you’ll also want to learn everything you can about your plan and the company that is covering you.

Will your plan cover pre-existing conditions? Is there an age limit or a limit on how long you can be out of your home country? Will you be able to see doctors for non-emergency visits? What about dental coverage?

There is a lot to learn, and it can be overwhelming if travel insurance is new to you.

Fortunately, it doesn’t have to be!

In this post, I’ll go over what is ACTUALLY covered by reputable travel insurance plans, so you know what to look for.

 

What Travel Insurance DOES Cover

Medical Emergencies
Chances are when you think of travel insurance, you’re picturing a medical emergency.

While accidents or serious illnesses while traveling abroad are rare, here’s what you can expect to be covered by a reputable insurance company:

  • Your hospitalization fee
  • Surgery costs
  • Outpatient treatment costs
  • Visits to registered medical practitioners (relating to your emergency injury)
  • Prescribed medicines (relating to the injury)
  • Medical evacuation (usually this is just to a local medical facility unless you have a more comprehensive plan from a company like MedJet. See below for more on evacuation.)

Emergency Evacuation
Medical evacuations due to accidents or natural disasters can cost upwards of $500,000. Naturally, this is where having a solid insurance plan comes in handy. Most insurance plans will evacuate you to a local hospital in case of injury or a nearby location in the case of a natural disaster.

In some cases, you will be repatriated back to your home country as well (though this is rare and usually only occurs in cases where local medical staff can’t provide the assistance you need).

Dental Emergencies
As with other medical emergencies, what’s covered here is accidental injury and sudden pain. For example, chipped teeth or a sudden infection.

General checkups are not covered, nor is major dental work that doesn’t relate to an injury or accident sustained abroad. And if you just want your teeth cleaned or a new filling, you’ll have to pay for that out of pocket.

Death Overseas
I know it’s never fun thinking about something like this happening, but knowing that you’re covered will give you and your loved ones peace of mind.

Should the worst happen, most insurance plans will cover the costs of a family member coming to get your body to take it home. Some policies will also include cremation services or burial overseas, should that be preferred.

Common exclusions would include death from alcohol or illicit narcotics, suicide, or pre-existing conditions not covered by the plan.

Flight Delays and Cancellations
If your flight gets delayed or canceled, you can apply for compensation from your travel insurance provider (assuming the airline doesn’t provide coverage for you). As long as the cancellation or delay is not your fault, you can apply for reimbursement. However, if you miss your flight because you slept in, that doesn’t count as a valid reason!

Be sure to keep all emails, receipts, and correspondence from your airline regarding the delay or cancellation, as you’ll need them to verify your claim and get reimbursed.

Trip Cancellation
If you need to cancel your trip — either before you depart or during your trip — for a verified medical reason, the death of a close relative, or the death of your travel partner, you can apply to get reimbursed from your insurance company.

To verify your claim, be sure to get a note from your doctor if you’re canceling due to illness. If you’re canceling due to a death, you’ll need to submit a copy of the death certificate (as well as other supporting documentation).

Lost or Stolen Property
If your bags get stolen while you’re traveling, most travel insurance companies will reimburse you for some or all of the items (there are usually limits on gear like laptops and cameras unless you buy a comprehensive plan with additional coverage). Be sure to file a police report. It will be necessary for making a claim.

Coverage will usually include compensation for delayed baggage or baggage that’s damaged in transit as well.

If your wallet or passport is stolen, some plans will cover the cost of having a new passport or credit card mailed to you (this usually will depend on your residency). If your wallet is stolen with cash in it, most plans won’t reimburse you for the cash. One exception is the Explorer Plan from World Nomads, which covers up to $200 USD in cash compensation.

Damaged or Stolen Gear
Most travel insurance plans will include coverage for lost or stolen gear, such as laptops, cameras, and mobile phones. However, these high-ticket items usually have a cap on how much you’ll get back (usually under $1,000 USD per item). If you’re traveling with expensive gear, you’ll want to pay for supplementary coverage to make sure it’s sufficiently covered.

Be sure you have receipts for all your gear as well. Keep copies of them in your inbox, so if something happens, you can file your claim without having to track down copies.

What Travel Insurance Does NOT Cover

While every plan is different, here is a list of the most common things that will not usually be covered by your standard or basic travel insurance plan:

  • Accidents sustained while participating in extreme activities, like hang gliding, paragliding, or bungee jumping (though you can often upgrade to plans that do cover those activities)
  • Technical climbing or alpine hiking (again, some plans can be upgraded to cover these activities)
  • Alcohol- or drug-related incidents (including death)
  • Carelessness in handling your possessions and baggage
  • Pre-existing conditions. For example, if you have diabetes and need to buy more insulin, you won’t be covered
  • General checkups for non-emergencies
  • Stolen cash (usually not covered by the standard “theft coverage,” though some companies, like World Nomads, can insure a limited amount of your cash)
  • Missed flights or connections for reasons under your control

A few other notes about standard policies:

  • If civil unrest makes your destination unsafe but your government hasn’t called for an evacuation, most insurance companies won’t evacuate you. (MedJet is the exception here. They have the best evacuation coverage.)
  • Changing your mind about your trip, unfriending or breaking up with your travel partner, and pre-existing medical conditions don’t qualify for most trip cancellation plans
  • If your visa is refused, you likely won’t be reimbursed if you decide to cancel your trip

Suggested Companies

To help you stay safe on your next trip, here’s a list of the best travel insurance companies:

travel insurance nomadic mattMy favorite company is World Nomads. I’ve been using them since I started traveling all the way back in 2003. They are reliable, and claims are processed quickly and fairly. The company was built by an ex-nomad so he gets the traveler mindset and knows what travelers need to stay safe.

As someone who is often traveling, I prefer World Nomads because I can purchase and renew my insurance policy online in a matter of minutes (it’s super easy). They have a very friendly and responsive staff who answer questions and help solve problems via social media, they have great customer feedback, and most importantly, they provide a lot of coverage at a fair price.

They are also endorsed by Lonely Planet and National Geographic, which tells you how good they are!

Other good travel insurance companies to consider

  • Best high-end electronics coverage.
  • Affordable deductables.
  • Up to 5 million in coverage.
  • Available inside and outside of the USA.
  • Best for people living overseas.
  • The closest thing to normal health insurance.
  • Available for non-US residents.
  • 25 different places to choose from.
  • Short-term and annual plans.
  • Extensive medical transport coverage.
  • Available for residents of USA, Canada, and Mexico
  • Limited time spent in foreign medical facilities.
  • Affordable plans.
  • Basic coverage options.
  • Great for students/shoestring backpackers.
  • Applicable accounts include a free student discount card.
  • Compare plans from 28 providers.
  • Best company for over 65.
  • “Anytime advocates” ask insurer to give your claim a second look if you think it was unfairly denied.
  • Guaranteed low prices.

 

***

These days, I never leave home without travel insurance. Having had to make emergency claims a few times over the years, I’ve learned the hard way that it’s always better to be safe rather than sorry.

Just remember that travel insurance is a for-profit industry, which means you really need to do your research before you purchase a plan. Be sure to read your plan and the fine print so you know what exactly is covered and what they expect if you try to make a claim.

Keep any receipts, emails, and documentation relating to your trip in a separate folder in your email inbox. That way, you can easily make a claim if you need to.

While the cost can seem like a lot up front, when you compare it to the potential cost of an emergency evacuation or a hefty medical bill, it’s peanuts.

Most insurance plans will only cost you a few dollars per day, providing you — and your friends and family — peace of mind in the process. If you ask me, that’s money well spent.

 

Book Your Trip: Logistical Tips and Tricks

Book Your Flight
Find a cheap flight by using Skyscanner or Momondo. They are my two favorite search engines because they search websites and airlines around the globe so you always know no stone is left unturned.

Book Your Accommodation
You can book your hostel with Hostelworld as they have the largest inventory. If you want to stay somewhere other than a hostel, use Booking.com as they consistently return the cheapest rates for guesthouses and cheap hotels. I use them all the time.

Don’t Forget Travel Insurance
Travel insurance will protect you against illness, injury, theft, and cancellations. It’s comprehensive protection in case anything goes wrong. I never go on a trip without it as I’ve had to use it many times in the past. I’ve been using World Nomads for ten years. My favorite companies that offer the best service and value are:

The post What Does Travel Insurance ACTUALLY Cover? appeared first on Nomadic Matt's Travel Site.





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How to Road Trip Around Israel Like a Pro

Posted By : webmaster/ 20 0


The view of Tel Aviv's beachfront from Jaffa
Posted: 7/22/2019 | July 22nd, 2019

This guest post from Anastasia Schmalz and Tomer Arwas of Generation Nomads. They have spent an extensive amount of time traveling Israel and today are going to share their knowledge to help you road trip around Israel on a budget!

Having visited Israel regularly and completed three road trips across the country, we can confidently say that there is no better way to explore it than in your own car.

The road infrastructure is well maintained throughout the country, and distances between destinations are short. You can start your day floating in the Dead Sea, the lowest point on earth, and watch the sunset a couple of hours later from the porch of your wooden cabin in the Golan Heights or on a Mediterranean beach.

Additionally, having your own vehicle means that you can visit places off the beaten path that buses and trains don’t reach. For example, on our route from Masada to Tel Aviv, we took a spontaneous detour to visit a traditional Bedouin desert village, which wouldn’t have been possible if we didn’t have a rental car.

Over the years, we have built up know-how and resources that help us to make our road trips a smooth and wallet-friendly experience.

Budgeting: What will your daily costs be like?

Israel has become one of the most expensive tourist destinations in the world in recent years and, according to the Israeli newspaper Haaretz, the cost of a visit can exceed expensive cities such as Zurich, Paris, London, and Moscow. Here are some average costs:

Accommodations (per night):

  • Hostel: 85 NIS ($24 USD) per bed in a 4-bed dorm room
  • Hotel: 300 NIS ($83 USD) per room
  • Airbnb: 300 NIS ($83 USD) per room or for the entire place

Food:

  • Main course on the menu of a restaurant: 60 NIS ($17 USD)
  • Street food meal (e.g., falafel or shawarma sandwich, with a drink): 25 NIS ($7 USD)

Car rental:

  • Rental: 80-140 NIS ($22-39 USD) per day
  • Gas: Although prices vary, expect to spend 6–7 NIS ($1.67–1.95 USD) per liter of gasoline

How to Rent a Car in Israel

Anastasia Schmalz and Tomer Arwas of Generation Nomads at Jaffa during sunset
As you’re planning to explore the country in your own wheels, renting a car at the airport might seem like the most logical step to take. However, if you plan to spend a couple of days in Tel Aviv first, we advise renting the car later, in the city center. The reason is that by picking up and returning the car at the airport, the rental price will be subject to an additional tax. Furthermore, you will avoid the headache of parking in Tel Aviv, where finding a parking spot feels like being Tom Cruise in Mission: Impossible.

There are many car rental agencies in Tel Aviv that can help arrange your rental, or you can select the pickup location online if you decide to reserve a car before your trip. We recommend comparing prices on sunnycars.com, or calling or walking up to brokers directly. Rental fees are dependent on the seasons and typically start around 80 NIS ($22 USD) per day.

There are plenty of options for renting your car in the city center. Most rental companies are located on HaYarkon Street near the Dan Tel Aviv Hotel, where you can walk from one to another to do some price comparison before choosing the one that suits you best.

There are several smaller car rental agencies that have more attractive prices than the large players. We have frequently rented cars from those companies without any issues.

These are some of our recommended rental agencies:

  • Auto Shay, HaYarkon St 130, Tel Aviv-Yafo
  • TIR, HaYarkon St 132, Tel Aviv-Yafo
  • Eldan, Kaufmann St 10, Tel Aviv-Yafo
  • Hertz, HaYarkon St 144, Tel Aviv-Yafo
  • Shlomo Sixt, HaYarkon St 122, Tel Aviv-Yafo
  • Europcar, HaYarkon St 80, Tel Aviv-Yafo

When comparing deals, be sure to take into account the type of insurance policy as well as the number of kilometers included; for the itinerary suggested below, you can expect to log a total of 850 to 1,000 kilometers. Also, check ahead if your driver’s license is valid in Israel by calling a rental agency and verifying the requirements directly with them.

Driving Safety Tips for Israel

Anastasia Schmalz at the Dead Sea in Israel
Driving in Israel is generally safe and comfortable. The road infrastructure is in good condition, with good signage. Nonetheless, Israeli drivers tend to be impatient and pushy, which should be taken into account if you are not used to driving under these conditions.

One important factor to consider in the planning of your trip is driving (or not driving) in the Palestinian territories, consisting of the West Bank and Gaza. There are set regulations to adhere to when entering the area. You will have to pass through army checkpoints on your way in and out and elaborate on the reasons why you wish to drive through. Moreover, do not rely on your GPS as may not work properly. Although the West Bank is now considered to be relatively safe, you should check with local authorities and your own country’s travel warnings for the latest travel advice.

Our Suggested Driving Route

a map for the suggested driving route around Israel

Start: Tel Aviv-Yafo —> Jerusalem —> Bethlehem —> Jericho —> Ein Gedi Nature Reserve —> Masada —>Dead Sea —> Tel Aviv —> Caesarea —> Zichron Ya’akov —> Haifa —> Acre —> Rosh Hanikra —> Galilee —> Golan Heights —> Beit She’an —> Tel Aviv-Yafo

How to Navigate Around Israel

Car rentals usually charge an extra fee for renting a GPS system. To save money, get an Israeli SIM card instead. For 50 NIS ($14 USD), you can get a two-week unlimited data package from local provider Partner. This also allows you to stay connected with family and friends, check out restaurant reviews, and keep your Insta story going.

With internet on your smartphone, there are several helpful apps you can use to navigate Israel during your road trip. iPhone’s built-in Maps app and Google Maps work quite well, but when in Rome, do as the Romans do: Waze is Israel’s most popular navigation app, as well as a social platform that monitors traffic and connects drivers on the road. The advantage of Waze is that it’s based on the most accurate traffic monitoring system in Israel and will always find you a best alternative route to skip traffic jams or inform you about speed cameras.

How to Park Your Car in Israel

Generation Nomads in Jerusalem
In major cities like Tel Aviv, Jerusalem, or Haifa, parking can be problematic. Finding a parking spot might require cruising around for 20 or even 30 minutes. When booking an accommodation in one of those cities, try to inquire whether they offer on-site parking. This will save you time and frustration.

If you do find street parking, make sure to comply with the rules. The curb of the streets is marked with the following color codes:

  • Blue + white = Paid parking
  • Red + white = No parking allowed
  • Solid gray = Free parking
  • Gray + yellow = Kiss and drive (you may not leave the car)

Another option in major cities is parking lots. They are more expensive and may charge a fixed price for the full day or by the hour.

Good news: On Shabbat (Friday sunset to Saturday sunset) parking is free of charge everywhere.

Here are some apps you can use to navigate your way around cities:

  • Moovit – This is the locals’ app for checking real-time bus arrival information and planning trips.
  • Google Maps – It is getting more accurate in recent years and can also be used to check real-time bus arrivals.
  • GetTaxi – The Israeli version of Uber, it’s a taxi-booking app that allows you to pay with a credit card.
  • Uber – Uber made its appearance in Israel several years ago and is becoming more popular.

2 Final Tips on Driving Around Israel

the Wailing Wall in Jerusalem, Israel

First, the best time of year for a road trip around Israel is during spring (April-June) and autumn (September-October), when weather is most pleasant. Unfortunately, the good weather also means that these the busiest months. Additionally, these are also the months with the most Jewish holidays, which are the busiest and most expensive times to visit (see below for more info). Winter months are rather unpredictable, and you won’t be guaranteed beach time, unless you had down south to Eilat. July and August are the hottest months of the year — even locals don’t spend much time outdoors, instead going from one air-conditioned space to another. Although rental cars are equipped with A/C, the heat and humidity can become unbearable during those months, and sightseeing can seem like a chore.

Second, Shabbat is the Jewish holy day of the week, from sunset Friday to sunset Saturday, and, besides weekly Shabbat, there are also many Jewish, Christian, and Muslim holidays throughout the year.

So how will these affect your trip?

First, Jewish holidays (many of which fall in the spring and autumn) are usually busy periods in Israel, and prices of accommodations and car rentals rise. Second, Israel is a Jewish state, meaning that during Shabbat and other holidays, many businesses (besides non-kosher restaurants) are closed. This may include some car rental companies, as well as shops, grocery stores, and museums. This is especially true in more religious cities and towns, such as Jerusalem. On Yom Kippur, Judaism’s most somber holiday, it is forbidden to drive. Moreover, there are observant Jewish neighborhoods where driving on Shabbat is unwelcome and even dangerous, such as Jewish Ultra Orthodox neighborhood in Jerusalem: Mea She’arim.

Lastly, Christian holidays such as Christmas and Easter attract many tourists and pilgrims to holy sites such as Jerusalem, Nazareth, and Bethlehem. Muslim holidays are not officially part of the national holiday calendar, but are still celebrated by the large Muslim population residing in Israel. Muslims observe Friday as the holy day of the week, meaning that Muslims sites and businesses are closed.

***

Having done three cross-country road trips over the last two years, our experience is that there is hardly any better way to explore Israel than in your own car! A well-maintained road infrastructure and short distances between (most) destinations make Israel a road trip–friendly country.

Planning your trip outside of the main Jewish holidays, renting your car from less expensive agencies, and using useful apps for navigating and parking in cities will give you the smoothest experience possible while helping you to save money.

Anastasia Schmalz and Tomer Arwas are travel coaches with the mission of helping millennials realize the life-transforming benefits of travel by designing a trip to be the journey towards a fulfilling lifestyle. In their blog generationnomads.com they write about topics related to the nomadic lifestyle, share pre-reads of their upcoming book, and offer guidance to travellers on how to make the most out of their travel. In their Friday newsletter and Instagram (@generationnomads) they offer free giveaways of their coaching tools & techniques.

Book Your Trip to Israel: Logistical Tips and Tricks

Book Your Flight
Find a cheap flight by using Skyscanner or Momondo. They are my two favorite search engines because they search websites and airlines around the globe so you always know no stone is left unturned.

Book Your Accommodation
You can book your hostel with Hostelworld. If you want to stay somewhere other than a hostel, use Booking.com as they consistently return the cheapest rates for guesthouses and cheap hotels. I use them all the time.

Don’t Forget Travel Insurance
Travel insurance will protect you against illness, injury, theft, and cancellations. It’s comprehensive protection in case anything goes wrong. I never go on a trip without it as I’ve had to use it many times in the past. I’ve been using World Nomads for ten years. My favorite companies that offer the best service and value are:

Looking for the best companies to save money with?
Check out my resource page for the best companies to use when you travel! I list all the ones I use to save money when I travel – and I think will help you too!

The post How to Road Trip Around Israel Like a Pro appeared first on Nomadic Matt's Travel Site.





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12 Things Every Person Who Wants to Travel with Their Dog Should Know

Posted By : webmaster/ 20 0


Boogie the pug and Marcelo the chi at the beach
Posted: 7/18/2019 | July 18th, 2019

This is a guest post from Candy Pilar Godoy, who blogs about pet travel at Boogie The Pug. She travels the world with her pug, Boogie, and her tiny chihuahua, Marcelo. She’s here to tell you how you can do the same with your dog!

Many people assume that it’s supremely difficult — if not impossible — to travel with dogs. So most assume that they’ll need to fork over a truckload of cash to cover the dog-sitting costs of leaving their pooches behind while they travel.

However, I learned that, with research and a little extra planning, you can take your furry friends along with you on most travel adventures — and it’s not as difficult as you might think.

According to the 2017–2018 National Pet Owners Survey, 68% of US households own a pet. That’s 89 million dogs, an increase of 56% since 1988.

And of that number, about 37% of pet owners actually travel with their pets every year, up from just 19% a decade ago. The International Pet and Animal Transportation Association reported that, worldwide, more than four million live animals are transported on planes every year.

The travel industry has had to adapt to this growing demand, and today, traveling with your dog is easier than ever.

As someone who is extremely passionate about traveling AND dogs, I wanted to share what I’ve learned on the road about this emerging trend.

1. Don’t assume it’s a no

Boogie the pug in Rio de Janeiro
Travel with animals increases every year, and it’s taken establishments time to catch up, meaning lots of places don’t have dog policies in place just yet (or their policies have yet to be thoroughly fleshed out). I’ve heard plenty of stories of restaurants and hotels whose websites and/or social media have listed themselves as dog friendly, when in reality they’re not. It happens.

When in doubt, always ask. Never assume that dogs are or are not allowed. It’s great to look for a “No Pets Allowed” sign or a “Pet Friendly” notice, but whether a place has one or not, it’s always best to double-check. A quick email or phone call can save you a lot of time, confusion, and frustration. For example, I’ve been pleasantly surprised to learn that dogs are welcome in most shopping malls in Rio de Janeiro. Who knew?

2. Make copies of pet-related documents

Boogie the pug kayaking in Vermont
If you’re planning to cross borders or travel internationally, you’ll need your dog’s health records on hand (sort of like us humans and our passports). These are necessary to prove that your dog is healthy and vaccinated. Officials ask to see them, and depending on who you deal with, they’ll either keep the originals or make a copy. Additionally, if you need to visit a new vet abroad, you’ll be able to provide them with your furry friend’s medical history.

For these reasons, I like to keep multiple copies of my dogs’ medical records and vet information on us at all times. This includes both a virtual copy on my phone and printed copies in my day bag.

3. Use dog-friendly apps

Boogie the pug in Philadelphia
There are plenty of apps that can help when on the road with your pup. It’s become a lot easier than when I used to travel the world sans iPhone. My favorites include:

  • All Trails This has the largest collection of trail maps (over 50,000). Browse photos and reviews, and filter your search by dog-friendly trails so you know which hikes to hit with your dog.
  • Bring Fido The Yelp of the dog world. Bring Fido helps you locate nearby hotels, attractions, and restaurants that welcome pets.
  • Pet First Aid by American Red Cross This app helps you locate the nearest emergency animal hospital, and provides step-by-step instructions for common pet emergencies.

4. Skip hotel fees


Many hotels charge additional fees to accommodate your pet. These can range from a one-time fee of $50–$250 to a daily charge of $10–$50 on average. These extra costs add up, increasing the price of your trip and putting pressure on your budget. If you book a hotel with a $50/night pet fee for a week, that’s an additional $350!

There are some hotel chains, however, that welcome your pets without asking for any extra cash — no additional fees, no deposits, and no one-time charges. Consider one of these hotels when you’re booking your next trip. My favorite pet-friendly hotels with no extra fees include:

  • Kimpton – With no additional fees or deposits, Kimpton Hotels rank high in terms of pet-friendliness. Plus, there’s no size or weight limit, and no limit on the number of pets allowed.
  • Red Roof Inn – This upscale economy chain has over 580 locations in the US, and additional locations in Brazil and Japan. They allow all family pets weighing 80 lbs. or less.
  • Motel 6 – Motel 6 hotels are a great option for anyone on a US road trip, with over 1,400 locations across the United States and Canada. They welcome all well-behaved pets, with a maximum allowance of two pets per room.

Can’t find a good hotel in the area? Try airbnb.com. They have an easy search function that filters for pet-friendly homes. We often use Airbnb when traveling internationally.

Pro tip: Before booking with any hotel, ask these questions to ensure that your stay is comfortable.

5. Take a pet carrier

Boogie the pug in a backpack
There are many options on the market when it comes to pet carriers. My favorites include the k9 Sport Sack, a dog carrier backpack that fits dogs of up to 40 lbs. (psst — use the promo code BOOGIE for 10% off). It comes in multiple colors and can be personalized with patches. I also use The Roodie, a pet-carrier hoodie that holds dogs weighing up to 15 lbs.

6. Be respectful of the people you meet

a dog playing in a water sprinkler in Berlin
No matter where you go with your dog, be honest and considerate with those around you. Some people love animals, while others can be terrified of even a tiny puppy. Be polite and know your dog’s limits.

Remember that human relationships with dogs vary incredibly across cultures. For example, in Guatemala, we saw more street dogs than pets. People were often surprised to learn that our dogs travel on planes, and even more taken aback to learn that they sleep in our bed. Try to be aware of these cultural differences, and be sensitive to the human-canine boundaries to which people are accustomed.

Moreover, if your pet tends to be unfriendly with humans (or other dogs), make that very clear to anyone approaching. You don’t want to end up in a situation that could have been avoided with a clear warning. After all, dogs are animals — as owners we are the ones responsible for them.

7. Triple-check airline pet policies

Boogie the pug and Marcelo the chi in Paraty, Brazil
When flying, especially internationally, we always double-check, if not triple-check, airline pet policies. Policies are constantly in flux, and rules are always changing. You want to make extra certain that you and your dog are both welcome on that flight. I usually check the airline’s website, give them a call, and send an email confirmation when I’m bringing my dogs on a flight.

Policies and prices for flying with your pet also vary according to a few factors. They usually depend on the airline, the country you’re traveling to, and the size and breed of your pet. There’s also the option of air travel in the cabin, in cargo, and in baggage. (Want to know the difference between these three? Click here.)

Some of my favorite dog-friendly airlines include American Airlines, Delta Airlines, Air France, and JetBlue.

8. Countries differ

Boogie the pug and Marcelo the chi at the beach
When it comes to crossing borders, countries differ in their rules and regulations for allowing your pup entry. Some only ask for a rabies vaccine and paperwork from your vet, while others require a pet quarantine and high fees. There’s also a list of banned breeds for whom some countries won’t allow entry at all.

The hardest countries to enter tend to be islands, like Australia, Japan, Fiji, and Iceland. The easiest are countries in the European Union (if your pup has an EU passport!). Research the rules of your destination country thoroughly and far enough in advance to ensure that you can meet all the requirements.

9. Make dog friends

Boogie the pug and Marcelo the chi
As I said earlier, dogs are social animals. When you’re out walking or spending time at the local park, befriend other dogs and their owners. They’ll let you in on their favorite hangouts, the best dog-friendly restaurants in the area, and which vets they trust. Dog owners know best, and they’re a great resource to have. Here are the best ways to find a local dog community online or IRL:

  • Go on a walk – Grab your pup and head out for a walk around the neighborhood. Stop to sniff a butt or two, and talk to dog people. Speaking to local dog owners is the best way to get the lowdown on the area, and all of the dog-friendly places around town.
  • Instagram – These days, dogs everywhere have their own Instagram profiles. Look up hashtags, like #dogsof and enter in your location. You’ll find dogs all over the world. Find some local pups and send them a message asking for tips.
  • Visit a dog park – Dog parks are a great place to exercise and socialize. Many major cities have them. If there aren’t any official dog parks in your area, ask local dog owners or people online about unofficial places where your dogs can romp around.
  • Find an online community – Online platforms host a myriad of groups based on things like breed, location, dog size, and activity level. I recommend searching Facebook and Meetup.com. Many online communities host meetups and social gatherings that you and your pup can join. They’re also a great place to ask questions.
  • Go to a pet store – Local pet shops are great resources for information. Many post flyers for local dog services, or information on nearby dog-related activities for you and your four-legged friend.

10. Pack the essentials

Boogie the pug and Marcelo the chi at the beach
As much as you’d like to just grab your dog and go, there are a few things you’ll definitely need to bring along. Poop bags, a leash and harness, and ID tags are just a few. Pack your pup’s essentials in case you can’t find them on the road (not every location has a good pet store!).

Here’s a checklist of things you might need. It includes things like:

  • Dog food and water
  • Collapsible bowls
  • Toys
  • A bed
  • Flea and tick medicine
  • Medical records and travel documents

Also, make sure your dog is microchipped and always up to date on standard vaccinations.

11. Teach your dog manners

Marcelo the chihuahua in Guatemala
Before you hit the road, it’s best if your dog knows a thing or two. Basic commands, like “sit” and “stay,” will make managing a dog while traveling easier. A well-trained dog can be left behind in a hotel room or rental to rest for a few hours while you have a nice dinner or visit a museum.

Plus, you’re more likely to get a “yes” to your requests if people see that your dog is well behaved. No one wants to be around a barking or rowdy dog who won’t listen!

Work on obedience and manners, and make sure your pup always puts their best paw forward.

If you need help, working with a certified trainer is best. There are also many resources online to help ensure that your dog is obedient and ready to venture out into the world. I recommend the AllThingsPups training tips — they have a YouTube channel, Instagram account, and podcast.

12. Say hello!

Boogie the pug getting lots of attention in Guatemala
Seeing a dog always puts a smile on a stranger’s face. Be polite to people you encounter with your pup. Kindness goes a long way.

On a recent flight, a friendly exchange with a dog-loving airline worker led to my pups and me getting a whole row to ourselves. Extra legroom and seat space are always welcome!

I’ve also gotten free treats, lots of useful tips, and other upgrades all because of a smile, some amicable banter, and of course, my friendly pups.

***

Travels with my dogs are more colorful and locally focused, and force me to explore parts of my destination that I would have never experienced had I been dogless. My dogs help me meet more people, see more places, and live in and cherish the present. There’s no better way to appreciate a new place than with a dog!

Candy Pilar Godoy has visited almost 40 countries across six continents, and speaks three languages. She often travels with her dogs, and writes about pet travel on her blog Boogiethepug.com. Candy currently lives in Rio de Janeiro with her two dogs, Boogie and Marcelo, and cat Kitty. Follow them on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.

Book Your Trip: Logistical Tips and Tricks

Book Your Flight
Find a cheap flight by using Skyscanner or Momondo. They are my two favorite search engines because they search websites and airlines around the globe so you always know no stone is left unturned.

Book Your Accommodation
You can book your hostel with Hostelworld. If you want to stay somewhere other than a hostel, use Booking.com as they consistently return the cheapest rates for guesthouses and cheap hotels. I use them all the time.

Don’t Forget Travel Insurance
Travel insurance will protect you against illness, injury, theft, and cancellations. It’s comprehensive protection in case anything goes wrong. I never go on a trip without it as I’ve had to use it many times in the past. I’ve been using World Nomads for ten years. My favorite companies that offer the best service and value are:

Looking for the best companies to save money with?
Check out my resource page for the best companies to use when you travel! I list all the ones I use to save money when I travel – and I think will help you too!

The post 12 Things Every Person Who Wants to Travel with Their Dog Should Know appeared first on Nomadic Matt's Travel Site.





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My new book, Ten Years a Nomad, is out TODAY!

Posted By : webmaster/ 17 0


10 Years a Nomad by Matt Kepnes
Posted: 7/16/2019 | July 16th, 2019

IT’S HERE!

After eighteen months of writing and editing, my new book, Ten Years a Nomad: A Traveler’s Journey Home, is on sale now.

The book is a memoir about my ten years traveling and backpacking the world, philosophy on travel, and the lessons I learned that can help you travel better. It takes you on a trip around the world from start to finish: getting the bug, the planning, setting off, the highs, the lows, the friends, what happens when you come back — and the lessons and advice that come with all that.

It features lots of stories I’ve never told on this blog.

I poured my heart and soul into this book. It’s very personal. In fact, my friends have been really surprised at how personal I got (there’s going to be some awkward conversations after my family reads this book).

But this is not all about me.

This is about what I learned and how you can apply it to your travels. How you can get inspired, work through your fears, meet people, and become a better traveler. Unlike my previous books, this is not a “how to guide” but a collection of tips, advice, and stories from the road that can be used no matter where you are in the world or how long you’ll be away.

This book gets to the heart of wanderlust and what extended travel around the world can teach us about life, ourselves, and our place in the world. (Or at least tries to.)

In this book, you’ll find:

  • Crazy hostel stories
  • What it’s like to travel the world for ten years
  • My philosophy on travel
  • Lessons learned from the road
  • How to cope with travel burnout
  • How to make friends
  • Inspirational stories and insights

If you want to know what it’s like to travel the world and live out a backpack, this book will tell you. If you want to be inspired to travel and better understand how you can do it too, this book is for you.

If you just want a good travel book to read on the beach, this book is for you.

You can get the book online at the following places:

An amazon blue purchase button A blue Barnes and Noble purchase button 

(Or walk into your local independent bookstore and pick up a copy!)
 

5 Early Reviews of the Book

So what are people saying of the book?

“In his heartfelt explanation and exploration, Matt runs through just why he’s been out there, backpacking the world for 10 years. By the end we’ve definitely realized, like Matt, how important travel is and how getting out there, on the road, can make you, me and the world a better place. It’s a great pity certain people at the very top of the world’s power pyramid never had just a little taste of the nomadic experience.” – Tony Wheeler, founder of Lonely Planet

“Throughout his ruminations on how travel affected him, Kepnes interweaves his tales of friends, girlfriends, and great loves discovered among exotic backdrops and how starting a blog (nomadicmatt.com) about his adventures altered the way he traveled. His story is one of heartbreak, self-discovery, and the constant travel itch he had to scratch in order to become the man he was supposed to be. An entertaining, quick read by a man who did what many of us only dream about.” – Kirkus Book Reviews

“Inspirational” – Cheryl Strayed

10 Years a Nomad book review

 

Buy a Copy, Get Free Stuff!!

If you order my book within the first week it’s out, you can get free copies of my other books, one-on-one travel planning advice, free attendance at TravelCon, blogging courses, free hostel stays and flights, and more!

The packages are listed below. All you need to do to claim your bonuses is email me a copy of your receipt at matt@nomadicmatt.com.

The Basic Package (cost: $18, value: $48)
Purchase one copy of the book and get:

  • How to Build a Travel Blog ebook (value: $9.99)
  • The Ultimate Guide to Travel Hacking ebook (value: $9.99)
  • 27 Ways to Be a Master Traveler PDF (value: $5)
  • 50 Inspiring Travel Books and Movies PDF (value: $5)

***BEST VALUE*** The Tenner (cost: $182, value: $594)
Buy 10 copies of my book and get ALL THE ABOVE plus:

  • My 12 city and country guides (value: $150)
  • A signed copy of my book How to Travel the World on $50 a Day (value: $15)
  • A 15-minute planning call with me (ask me anything)! (value: $100)
  • The Business of Blogging course (value: $99)

The Bullseye (cost: $900, value: $2,193)
Buy 50 copies of my book and get ALL THE ABOVE plus:

  • One ticket to TravelCon in New Orleans (value: $399)
  • A 30-minute planning call with me (ask me anything)! (value: $200)

Note: All digital bonuses will be sent when you send the receipt. Travel arrangements will be worked out between you and me and are valid for six months after purchase (i.e., you have to make a booking by then).
 

The “Ten Years a Nomad” Book Tour

I’m going on book tour! Come join me, talk travel, get a signed book, and hang out! Here are the dates:

July 16 New York, NY: The Strand Bookstore @ 7pm EVENT DETAILS
July 17 Boston, MA: The Harvard Coop @ 7pm EVENT DETAILS
July 18 Philadelphia, PA: Penn Book Center @ 6:30pm EVENT DETAILS
July 22 Washington DC: Politics and Prose at the Wharf @ 7pm EVENT DETAILS
July 23 Miami, FL: Books & Books @ 8pm EVENT DETAILS
July 24 Tampa, FL: Oxford Exchange @ 6:30pm EVENT DETAILS
July 30 Detroit, MI: Pages Bookshop @ 6:00pm EVENT DETAILS
July 31 Chicago, IL: City Lit Books @ 6:30pm EVENT DETAILS
August 1 Dallas, TX: Half Price Books (Flagship) @ 7:00pm EVENT DETAILS
August 5 Austin, TX: Book People @ 7pm EVENT DETAILS
August 6 Houston, TX: Brazos Bookstore @ 6:30pm EVENT DETAILS
August 7 Denver, CO: Tattered Cover – Historic Lodo @ 7pm EVENT DETAILS
August 8 San Diego, CA: Warwick’s @ 7:30pm EVENT DETAILS
August 12 Los Angeles, CA: The Last Bookstore @ 7:30pm EVENT DETAILS
August 14 Portland, OR: Powell’s Books at Cedar Hills Crossing @ 7:00pm EVENT DETAILS
August 15 San Francisco, CA: Book Passage at Corte Madera @ 7pm EVENT DETAILS
August 16 Seattle, WA: Third Place Books @ 6pm EVENT DETAILS
August 19 Vancouver, BC: Indigo (Robson) @ 7:00pm EVENT DETAILS
August 22 Calgary, AB: LOCATION TBD EVENT DETAILS
August 26 Toronto, ON: LOCATION TBD EVENT DETAILS
August 31 Montreal, QC: Indigo (Place Montreal) @ 1:00pm EVENT DETAILS

P.S. – There will be an afterparty in NYC after the initial book launch. It will be at Solas. Click here for details!
 

Want to Help Me Spread the Word About This Book?

I’m always looking for more opportunities to talk travel. Here’s how you can help me spread the word about the new book:

Want to interview me?
If you have a blog, podcast, vlog, or Instagram channel and want to interview me about the book and travel, let me know at matt@nomadicmatt.com using the subject line “Book Interview.” I’d love to talk with you!

Are you in the media and want to cover the book?
If you work for a major media outlet and want to interview me about the book or would like to review the book, let me know at matt@nomadicmatt.com using the subject line “Media Request.”

Know anyone that I should reach out to for promotion?
If you have suggestions on people who would love a copy of this book and would be a good fit for promoting the book, let me know in the comments, or feel to email me at matt@nomadicmatt.com with the subject line “Book Promotion Help.”

****

Thank you so much for your support and love over the years. I really hope you love this book. I wanted to write something that would appeal to a wider range of readers. Please help spread the word, get a copy, and I hope to see you on the book tour.

– Nomadic Matt

Once again, here are links to get the book today:

An amazon blue purchase button A blue Barnes and Noble purchase button 

Book Your Trip: Logistical Tips and Tricks

Book Your Flight
Find a cheap flight by using Skyscanner or Momondo. They are my two favorite search engines because they search websites and airlines around the globe so you always know no stone is left unturned.

Book Your Accommodation
You can book your hostel with Hostelworld as they have the largest inventory. If you want to stay somewhere other than a hostel, use Booking.com as they consistently return the cheapest rates for guesthouses and cheap hotels. I use them all the time.

Don’t Forget Travel Insurance
Travel insurance will protect you against illness, injury, theft, and cancellations. It’s comprehensive protection in case anything goes wrong. I never go on a trip without it as I’ve had to use it many times in the past. I’ve been using World Nomads for ten years. My favorite companies that offer the best service and value are:

Looking for the best companies to save money with?
Check out my resource page for the best companies to use when you travel! I list all the ones I use to save money when I travel – and that will save you time and money too!

The post My new book, Ten Years a Nomad, is out TODAY! appeared first on Nomadic Matt's Travel Site.





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